Sport nets can be dangerous to wildlife

a20141227_121635Most wildlife patients don’t come to us because of nature. Most are injured because of people. They fly into our windows, are hit by our cars, poisoned by our chemicals, and disturbed by our children and pets. Hazards are everywhere, even in an innocent ball-field.

Such was the case when Peggy responded to a call about an owl in a soccer net. The following pictures demonstrate the patience and concentration needed to extricate the Great Horned Owl.

Note in the featured picture, the owl seems to understand, and eyes meet in a moment of trust.

a20141227_121227 a20141227_121321 a20141227_121422 a20141227_121635 a20141227_121700 a20141227_121804 (2) a20141227_121816

 

Notice WildlifeRehabilitationSchool.com Students

The WildlifeRehabilitationSchool software has been upgraded and moved. The organization now running the school software is Wildlife EDU.com.

Don’t worry:

This is still part of Red Creek Wildlife Center

You are still enrolled in your courses.

Our software has been upgraded and you will now get your own personal account and log-in. Your certificates will be part of your student record.

Please fill out the form below, and Peggy will contact you with your new personal log-in and instructions on how to get back into your classes. Please give her 48 hours to register your new account and course enrollments

We apologize for the inconvenience, but following this little bump in the road, you will have a much more enjoyable learning experience.

Your Name (required)

Email associated with your payment (required)

Which course(s) were you enrolled in?

Date enrolled in the Telephone course:

Date enrolled in the Medical Math course:

Add a Personal Message

Become a Volunteer

Wildlife rehabilitation work is multifaceted and demanding. Many permit holders burn out and their centers close after just a few years.

Red Creek has been serving Southeastern Pennsylvania continuously since 1991 and we attribute much of that success to our volunteers. Red Creek treats all species of Pennsylvania wildlife and admits over 1000 wild patients each year. One person can not do the work alone but together we can make a huge difference.

Whether you are comfortable working with the animals or not, YOU have special talents we can use. If you love what we are doing and want to be a part, please check out what we have to offer:

NOTE – Requirements for many positions have changed. Please read all requirements before applying!

Animal Care Assistant – Year Round
College Summer Program
Nursery Care Assistant / Internship- April through September
Wildlife Information Operator (Answering Telephones) – April through September
General Maintenance Volunteer – (GMV)
Wildlife Capture and Transport (WCT) – Year Round

High School Public Service for Ages 16-18
is now available. Fill out an application

Animal Care Assistant – Year Round

 Overview
The Animal Care Assistant is a year-round volunteer position within
Red Creek. You will get to know the staff, volunteers and animals on
a personal level, be exposed to and have the opportunity to assist with all aspects of wildlife rehabilitation including: first aid, treatment, admissions, medications, and releases. Animal Care Assistants are automatically approved for the Nursery Care Positions if desired.

General Tasks
Assist the clinic staff by cleaning cages, weighing animals, preparing diets and feeding the “self-feeding” animals. The Animal Care Assistant also helps with cleaning and maintaining the facilities, laundry and dishes.

Requirements
Must be at least 18 years of age The demands of treating 1000 animals each year (most of them between May and September) require the highest level of commitment from our volunteers. While we certainly work around our volunteer’s other commitments, absolute reliability insofar as manning your shift is required!

ACA shifts are a minimum of four hours long, between 9am and 3pm.  ACAs are asked to commit to one full year, are required to volunteer weekly and to work the same shift each week.  College students who can only commit to the summer should sign up for our College Summer Program.

The clinic is open seven days a week, year-round.

Animal care involves the ability to bend and kneel easily, carry buckets of water and food to outdoor enclosures (about 20 pounds), stand for 4 hours, walk unaided and walk on uneven outdoor terrain.

If you have any questions or concerns about these requirements, or the application process, please feel free to contact us.

Application
An application can be filled out on-line or downloaded to print. Applicants must also read and sign our volunteer agreement, liability release form and provide a criminal background check .

Although our application requirements may seem strict, working with wildlife is both a great responsibility and a great privilege. Wildlife rehabilitation is strictly regulated by state and federal laws and Red Creek Wildlife Center does not take that responsibility lightly.

Nursery Care Assistant / Internship -
April through September

Overview
The Nursery Care Assistant is a highly coveted seasonal volunteer
position within Red Creek. Feeding baby wild animals (both mammals and birds) is a round-the-clock task that takes a special commitment and offers great personal rewards. Nursery Care Assistants will also be asked to perform tasks associated with the Animal Care Assistant position and help other volunteers with general tasks.

General Tasks
Learn proper feeding techniques for many baby wild mammals and birds and maintain a strict feeding schedule for those animals.

Requirements
Must be at least 18 years of age The demands of treating 1000 animals each year (most of them between May and September) require the highest level of commitment from our volunteers. While we certainly work around our volunteer’s other commitments, absolute reliability insofar as manning your shift is required! NCA shifts are a minimum of four hours long, in the morning, afternoon or evening.

NCAs are asked to commit to 3 full months, are required to volunteer weekly and to work the same shift each week. Evening shifts might be available.

NCA involves working with common species of songbirds and  mammals. Juvenile raptor care and the care of (RVS) Rabies Vector Species (raccoons, foxes, skunks, coyotes, woodchucks and bats) are NOT part of the general NCA program. Individuals interested in working with RVS must attend a state approved RVS training class (when available) and have proof of rabies vaccines or protective titer within the past 2 years.

If you have any questions or concerns about these requirements, or the application process, please feel free to contact us.

Application
An application can be filled out on-line or downloaded to print. Applicants must also read and sign our volunteer agreement, liability release form and provide a criminal background check .

Although our application requirements may seem strict, working with wildlife is both a great responsibility and a great privilege. Wildlife rehabilitation is strictly regulated by state and federal laws and Red Creek Wildlife Center does not take that responsibility lightly.

Wildlife Information Operator (WIO) – April through September

Overview
RCWC receives thousands of phone calls each year about wildlife in distress. The advice a caller receives can determine the future of an animal. Our WIO volunteer is often the most important first contact
on behalf of that animal.

General Tasks
The WIO line receives calls from the general public, veterinary offices, animal shelters, police departments and others. The nature of the calls includes: distressed wildlife in need of care, nuisance wildlife, orphaned wildlife, and general wildlife questions. Full training is provided.

Requirements
Good telephone communication skills.

Extreme patience in working with the public.

The demands of treating 1000 animals each year (most of them between May and September) require the highest level of
commitment from our volunteers. While we certainly work around our volunteer’s other commitments, absolute reliability insofar as manning your shift is required!

WIO shifts are a minimum of four hours long, in the morning, afternoon or evening. NCAs are asked to commit to 3 full months, are required to volunteer weekly and to work the same shift each week.

Must complete a 4 hour WIO training class – provided free by RCWC. If you have any questions or concerns about these requirements, or the application process, please feel free to contact us.

Application
An application can be filled out on-line or downloaded to print. Applicants must also read and sign our volunteer agreement, liability release form and provide a criminal background check .

Although our application requirements may seem strict, working with wildlife is both a great responsibility and a great privilege. Wildlife rehabilitation is strictly regulated by state and federal laws and Red Creek Wildlife Center does not take that responsibility lightly.

General Maintenance Volunteer – (GMV)

Overview
These volunteers help maintain the clinic, outdoor aviaries, wildlife garden, and more. Those who have basic carpentry, gardening, plumbing, house painting and/or masonry experience would be of great assistance to our organization.

Maintenance volunteers are not required to have a regular weekly shift; rather, we will contact you if we have a need
in your field of expertise once you have signed up.

If you have any questions or concerns about these requirements, or the application process, please feel free to contact us.

Application
An application can be filled out on-line or downloaded to print. Applicants must also read and sign our volunteer agreement, liability release form and provide a criminal background check .

Although our application requirements may seem strict, working with wildlife is both a great responsibility and a great privilege. Wildlife rehabilitation is strictly regulated by state and federal laws and Red Creek Wildlife Center does not take that responsibility lightly.

Wildlife Capture and Transport (WCT) – Year Round

 Overview
RCWC relies strongly on the public’s ability to get an animal to our door. We do understand that this is not always possible. The Wildlife Capture and Transport Specialist is a state and federal regulated activity that requires a permit. Red Creek provides the training, test and permit application required by Pennsylvania.

General Tasks
WCT personnel are on-call during scheduled times for a designated area. If the need arises, the WCT will drive to an animal situation, determine proper intervention, capture the animals if necessary and transport the animal to our facility.

Requirements
Attend the RCWC 5 hour class for WCT, pass a written test and successfully complete the state permit process. You must have a valid driver’s license and use your own vehicle.

Although some equipment can be supplied by RCWC as it is available, WCT personnel are required to purchase some of
their own equipment (Under $100).

Extreme patience in working with the public.

The demands of treating 1000 animals each year (most of them between May and September) require the highest level of
commitment from our volunteers. While we certainly work around our volunteer’s other commitments, although you do not need to be present at our facility, absolute reliability insofar as being available during your shift is required!

Because of the permitting process, WCT personnel are required to make a 2 year commitment. WCT involves the ability to out-think and out-maneuver injured wildlife in their natural environment. Basic health, agility and physical fitness are necessary.

If you have any questions or concerns about these requirments, or the application process, please feel free to contact us.

Application
An application can be filled out on-line or downloaded to print. Applicants must also read and sign our volunteer agreement, liability release form and provide a criminal background check .

Although our application requirements may seem strict, working with wildlife is both a great responsibility and a great privilege. Wildlife rehabilitation is strictly regulated by state and federal laws and Red Creek Wildlife Center does not take that responsibility lightly.

College Summer Program

 Overview
Due to the limited length of time available to college students, we offer an shorter, but intensive volunteer program. You will get to know the staff, volunteers and animals on a personal level, be exposed to and have the opportunity to assist with all aspects of wildlife rehabilitation including: first aid, treatment, admissions, medications, and releases. College students are automatically approved for the Nursery Care Positions.

General Tasks
Assist the clinic staff by cleaning cages, weighing animals, preparing diets and feeding the “self-feeding” animals. The Animal Care Assistant also helps with cleaning and maintaining the facilities, laundry and dishes.

Requirements
Must be a full-time college student.

The demands of treating 1000 animals each year (most of them between May and September) require the highest level of commitment from our volunteers. While we certainly work around our volunteer’s other commitments, absolute reliability insofar as manning your shifts is required!

Because the student can not commit to a full year, students are required to work 3 days per week, with 4 or more hour shift per day for the duration of their summer college break.

The clinic is open seven days a week, year-round.

Animal care involves the ability to bend and kneel easily, carry buckets of water and food to outdoor enclosures (about 20 pounds), stand for 4 hours, walk unaided and walk on uneven outdoor terrain.

If you have any questions or concerns about these requirements, or the application process, please feel free to contact us.

Application
An application can be filled out on-line or downloaded to print. Applicants must also read and sign our volunteer agreement, liability release form and provide a criminal background check .

Although our application requirements may seem strict, working with wildlife is both a great responsibility and a great privilege. Wildlife rehabilitation is strictly regulated by state and federal laws and Red Creek Wildlife Center does not take that responsibility lightly.

Volunteer Application

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Telephone (required)

Address (required)

Age
 15 and under 16 to 17 18 and older

Please select volunteer activities that interest you
(check as many as apply)
 Animal Care Assistant - Year Round Nursery Care Assistant / Internship Wildlife Information Operator Animal Capture and Transportation General Maintenance Volunteer

Please list days of the week available

Reason For Interest
(check as many as apply)
 Personal Development Career Development Educational Opportunity Mandatory School Requirement Probation / Public Service Requirement

Please list two references not related to you: List name, phone number and relationship.

Comments / Notes / Special Requests

Finch Eye Disease – AVIAN CONJUNCTIVITIS

Songbirds with eye infections are occasionally found at bird feeders this time of year. A bird might be observed sitting at a feeder for long fincheydiseaseperiods of time and depending on how advanced the infection is, the bird may fly away when approached or sit there blindly — allowing you to pick it up. There is treatment for this condition and there is a lot you can do to help.

Avian conjunctivitis is an eye infection that can inflict many species of songbird but is most often seen in house finches. The bacteria affect the conjunctiva, the membrane surrounding the eyes, causing the tissue to swell and become irritated. As the infection spreads, the bird can become completely blind. Starvation quickly follows if not treated.

Avian conjunctivitis is a bacterial infection easily spread at bird feeders, which is why it is more prevalent this time of year. Birds can contaminate the seed simply by visiting the feeder and once a sick bird finds a feeder, it may be reluctant to leave that food source because it cannot see. Healthy birds will quickly pick up the infection and spread it to other feeders as they visit the neighborhood.

Signs of a problem are swollen, red eyes, listlessness and approachability. Birds will often sit fluffed up as their energy reserves diminish.  If you see such a bird, do not wait to call us. Capture the bird immediately and place it in a box keeping it warm, dark and quiet. Call Red Creek and transport it to us as quickly as possible. We have a treatment of topical and oral antibiotics that has proven very successful at curing these birds.

Even if you do not see infected birds in your area, you can help reduce the spread of the disease by following a regular disinfection routine of your bird feeders:

” Twice each week allow the seed to empty in the feeder.

” Clean any debris and bird droppings from the feeder.

” After cleaning, soak the feeder in one part bleach to thirty parts water solution for fifteen minutes.

” Rinse and allow to completely dry before refilling the feeder with fresh seed.

It is very important to apply this routine to ALL the feeders in the area. Encourage your bird-friendly neighbors to do the same by printing and sharing this article with them.

Snowy Owl Released

Update:

snowyrelease1 - Copy

Our snowy girl from the arctic was released on Friday, December 12th, about 2pm in Berks County. The PA Game Commission helped locate the perfect release site for her.

Peggy, Red Creek’s founder, has been rehabilitating wildlife for 23 years. In all that time, no snowy was ever presented to Red Creek for rehabilitation. With the release of this bird, Red Creek has now rehabilitated and released every species of Pennsylvania owl.

http://readingeagle.com/berks-country/article/injured-snowy-owl-on-the-mend-at-wildlife-center
Harrisburg Patrol Officer Chris Thomas saw the snowy owl perched on top of Harrisburg Hospital.

“Oh, that’s weird,” he thought. “Maybe it’s just passing through.”

A few days later, he was dispatched to downtown Harrisburg when someone reported a snowy owl on the ground in distress. Thomas found the owl sitting on the sidewalk, staring.

Thomas, who grew up on a farm and had seen birds dazed from flying into windows, asked for a blanket and placed it on the bird’s wings to keep it calm. He knew putting the owl in his patrol car would distress it, so he picked it up and carried it to the station a few blocks away.
IMG_6945“It’s kind of funny because I’m walking down, and it’s afternoon time, and people didn’t really notice it,” he said. “I was kind of surprised.”

The police kept the bird in an old dog crate covered with a blanket inside the station’s garage, then called around to see who could pick her up. Peggy Hentz, founder and director of the Red Creek Wildlife Center in Schuylkill Haven, answered the call.

The owl, an adult female, had a concussion and needed cage rest and nutrition to heal, said Hentz, who has been rehabilitating injured wildlife for 23 years. The center, one of 30 in the state, treats more than 1,000 animals a year, from baby raccoons to orphaned deer and birds of prey.

Hentz suspects the owl flew into a building. They fed her mice to try to match her usual diet of lemmings, another type of small rodent.

The snowy owl is the first treated at Red Creek, and with it the center can now say it has treated every species of owl in Pennsylvania, Hentz said. Snowy owls usually only visit Pennsylvania for the winter, leaving sometime in February.

IMG_7007Snowy owls, which are tundra avian predators, rarely leave the Arctic, but in the last couple years sightings of the bird in the Mid-Atlantic region have increased, a phenomenon bird watchers call an irruption.

A snowy was seen, and eventually fitted with a GPS collar, near Womelsdorf last year.

Scott Weidensaul, co-director of Project SNOW Storm, a research program that collects data on snowy owls, said there were hundreds in Pennsylvania last winter.

“It was a once-in-a-lifetime event,” he said. “Here we are, a year later, at least at this point it’s not as big an irruption, but there’s still a significant movement of owls coming south into the Great Lakes.”

IMG_6946 - CopyThe Harrisburg owl was recovering quickly at Red Creek last week. Hentz and Greg Nason, a rehabilitation assistant at the center, moved the owl from a small cage to a larger pen. She was kept in the small cage to rest her wings, but after several strong test flaps she was moved to a larger pen.

“He’s definitely a lot stronger than he was,” Nason said, before they learned the owl was a female.

Sometime this week Hentz expects to release the bird.

Weidensaul, who banded the owl Monday, said he expects she will wander around near her release site.

“It’ll find a place that makes it comfortable,” he said.

Snowy owls typically look for two things in potential winter homes: somewhere that looks like home, with wide, flat, open spaces, and somewhere where there’s food.

“Anything they can push down their throats,” Weidensaul said. “They’re not picky eaters.”

For example, he’s known snowy owls to eat small mammals like lemmings and mice, but also ducks and geese.

“They’re incredibly agile,” he said. “For as big as they are, they’re fast fliers and quite capable of taking down small, fast birds.”

But the owls do not have a fear of humans, which gets them into trouble. Most snowy owls that die over winter don’t die from natural causes. They are hit by planes or cars, or fly into electrical lines. Like Hentz, Weidensaul thinks Red Creek’s snowy owl may have flown into a building.

“She hit something dirty, that’s for sure,” he said.

“A lot of snowy owls in rehab don’t make it,” Hentz said. “They get hit by a car or an airplane, or are so emaciated they’re not doing well. This one is healing.”

A “LOONEY” day at Red Creek

loony1 Loon-acy: Seven wayward loons brought to Red Creek Wildlife Center -

Things got a little looney at the Red Creek Wildlife Center, a refuge for injured animals in Schuylkill County.
In the space of a few hours Tuesday night, seven wayward loons were brought into the rural shelter near Schuylkill Haven.

Peggy Hentz, an animal rescue specialist who runs the center, said the migratory birds were apparently on their way from the Arctic to winter quarters in the Chesapeake Bay area. Motorists and passers-by rescued loons over an area from northern Schuylkill County to Kutztown, Hentz said, and brought them to the shelter.

“They were apparently confused by stormy weather and landed on highways and parking lots,” Hentz said.

Loons, she explained, confuse wet highways and parking lots for streams and lakes.

Once they land, the birds are unable to take off from land; their natural habitat is water. Because their feet are positioned to the rear of their bodies, they have difficulty even walking on land.

“They live in water and can’t function on land,” Hentz said. “Their legs were built to be paddles, not walkers.”

Red Creek, run largely by volunteers, has had loons in the past. But Tuesday’s invasion was the largest yet.

Shannon Wilson, a Kutztown University student, was driving on Route 222 about 2 p.m. Tuesday when she noticed a large bird at the side of the road.

Thinking it was a goose, she did a U-turn and approached the animal. Never having seen a loon, Wilson sought help and was directed to send Red Creek a photo.

Hentz identified the animal, and urged caution in capturing it. Loons have needle-sharp bills and, when in danger, could go for a person’s eyes.

Wilson, 21, a senior anthropology major from Easton, managed to crate the bird with the help of a passer-by. Then she drove it to Red Creek, a 45-minute ride from Kutztown.

“I was happy to do it,” said Wilson, an obvious animal lover. “In the short time I knew it, I became attached to the loon.”

Hentz and a team of volunteers released six of the seven loons Wednesday afternoon at the Landingville Dam on the Schuylkill River, near Orwigsburg. The seventh had been hit by a car and was unable to be released into the wild.

Cradling the aquatic birds, which are about the size of a wild goose, Hentz’s crew gently launched them into the water.

Known for their haunting call, the loons’ cry interrupted the silence along a stretch whose picturesque landscape was mirrored in the still water.

They paddled out and dove beneath the water, surfacing 20 or 30 yards from shore. To take flight, loons submerge to gain momentum and skim along the water in take-off mode after resurfacing.

The loons, Hentz said, will probably reside at Landingville and feed for a day or two before continuing their journey south. They’re healthy, and she’s confident they will survive.

Emily Case, 16, of Bernville, a junior volunteer at Red Creek, couldn’t handle a bird but got to take photos.

“This is why I love working at Red Creek,” said Emily, who is home-schooled.

Bonnie Bohnenblust of Bern Township, who volunteers at Red Creek, beamed with pride after releasing a loon.

“It’s a privilege,” she said. “You just want to see them go back into the wild.”

Contact Ron Devlin: 610-371-5030 or rdevlin@readingeagle.com. – See more at: http://readingeagle.com/news/article/loon-acy-seven-wayward-loons-brought-to-red-creek-wildlife-center#sthash.Kwbchcv7.dpuf

Because Everything Deserves a Second Chance

We believe your charitable investment should be life changing for both animals and people.

Download the brochure

Protecting Our Families and Community Since 1991

It’s obvious that wildlife rehabilitation helps animals, but did you know it protects people as well?

By providing a safe and humane service that helps a wild animal foundling in need, a family’s exposure to that animal is greatly reduced.

Through our services, our loved ones, especially our children and pets are protected from dangerous, possibly FATAL INJURY, DISEASE AND PARASITES.

Red Creek Wildlife Center relies solely on YOUR generous contributions to meet the ever growing need for our services.

Our Mission, Our Philosophy

To offer a second chance to distressed Pennsylvania wildlife through rescue and rehabilitation, public education and by providing training for wildlife rehabilitators.

We believe that every life, no matter how small or common, is precious and deserves a chance at life.

Taking in one to two thousand wild animals annually, from the tiniest hummingbird, to the largest eagle, from chipmunks to deer, Red Creek has been giving wildlife a second chance for over 20 years.

We believe that education is an important part of saving our wildlife, the environment and the planet for future generations.

Each year, tens of thousands of students enjoy a positive wildlife experience through Red Creek’s LIVE RAPTOR programs and assemblies.

We believe wildlife rehabilitation is a valuable service that should be available to everyone.

Red Creek is helping others become wildlife rehabilitators through classes, seminars and online training, expanding this serve to new areas in Pennsylvania and nationally.